Tag: City of Erie

InnovaTel Telepsychiatry

There are many interesting things about InnovaTel Telepsychiatry – including its unique blend of healthcare and technology. But what struck me when I was learning about the business is how it could operate anywhere, yet its leaders deliberately are choosing to stay in Erie.

If you’ve never heard of InnovaTel, that’s understandable. After all, the company is based here, but it serves clients in eight states – and most of its employees don’t live here, either.

InnovaTel provides telepsychiatric care – meaning it brings together psychiatrists and clinics, no matter their location, and links them remotely through a secure video platform. The company was started by Jon Evans and Lee Penman, who both worked at Hamot and who both later helped to found Erie’s Safe Harbor Behavioral Health.

InnovaTel, their new enterprise, reflects their continued commitment to providing quality mental health care, but adds a 21st century update.

As Evans and Penman explain, there is a shortage of psychiatrists across the country, a problem that is felt most acutely in rural areas. Telepsychiatry allows those underserved areas – rural, urban and everything in between – to more easily offer mental health care to residents.

The business, now about four years old, is growing as it becomes more established – and, as Penman says, as people are getting more used to the idea of telepsychiatry and telemedicine in general.

Part of that growth is coming from an expansion into correctional psychiatry – that is, forensic evaluations and mental health care done in correctional settings, like jails. It’s just another way of enhancing care while lowering costs – a combination that InnovaTel is confident will drive future success.

That brings me back to my main takeaway from this company: A growing company that can operate from anywhere, but one that is planting roots firmly in Erie County.

According to InnovaTel’s leaders, that’s not just an emotional decision, but a practical one. As Evans describes, Erie is a “hidden asset,” where the cost of doing business is significantly less than in other cities. In fact, they see the potential for Erie to become a hub of technology and health care.

“Our goal is to really grow this company and stay here,” Evans says.

About InnovaTel Telepsychiatry: The company is making a name for itself in the telemedicine industry – it has been named a strategic partner with the National Council for Behavioral Health, and it was recently ranked as one of the 10 most promising telemedicine providers by Healthcare Tech Outlook magazine. InnovaTel now has 30 psychiatrists on its roster, and it has partnered with more than 40 clinics – and more interest comes in every week. As a telemedicine company, InnovaTel’s focus must be on the technology as well as the health care. The company is very thorough in ensuring the quality of the video and audio connections – which are secure links to a licensed facility – and also to creating a comfortable atmosphere, which includes the lighting of the walls, the color of the room, and the placement of the TV at a patient’s eye level.

Why Erie County: As previously mentioned, InnovaTel’s leaders have found a benefit in the low overhead costs in Erie County. In addition, however, they found it beneficial to launch their business in Erie, where they already had connections in the community through their previous work.

Challenges of Erie County: InnovaTel’s remote nature requires that the Erie staff make site visits, so travel into and out of Erie – including at the airport – can be a challenge. Another challenge that has less to do with Erie County but nevertheless is a hurdle for the company comes from licensing requirements. InnovaTel’s psychiatrists must receive licensing from multiple states – and each state has different procedures and requirements. Evans says that given the increasing popularity of telemedicine, it might be time to explore the idea of a national licensing standard.

Fun fact: Former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, a mental health advocate and son of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy, is a member of InnovaTel Telepsychiatry’s advisory board.

Address: 2005 W. Eighth St., Erie, PA 16505 or www.intelpsych.com

McInnes Rolled Rings

McInnes Rolled Rings, which just celebrated its 25th anniversary, isn’t the only manufacturer of seamless rolled rings in the country. To stay competitive, then, they had to find a way to set themselves apart.

“We differentiate ourselves by being faster,” says Tim Hunter, president and CEO.

That means the company zeroes in on getting products made for its customers, and getting those products delivered in a timely manner. That turnaround time is even touted on the company’s website: “We ship in as few as five days.”

McInnes keeps the operation focused on that work, rather than branching into other services that would funnel away resources, Hunter says.

It’s a strategy that seems to be paying off for McInnes. The company serves more than 1,000 customers in North America – from Canada to Mexico, coast to coast – and is the fastest producer in its size range, Hunter says.

Part of that efficiency in service can also be attributed to advances in manufacturing. Thirty years ago, Hunter says, we could produce eight to 10 rolled rings in an eight-hour shift. Today, we can turn out 20 in an hour, thanks to modern equipment and procedures.

The old process “was used for thousands of years,” Hunter says. “But the technology changed dramatically.”

About McInnes Rolled Rings: The company produces seamless rolled rings – “just like your wedding ring, but bigger,” Hunter describes – that that can withstand high stress. The rings are used in products and equipment in a variety of industries, including oil and gas, aerospace, construction, mining and even healthcare. The smallest rings, which are about 10 inches in diameter, might be used in aircraft equipment, while the largest, 12-foot rings – which can weigh 8,000 pounds – might be used as flanges on oil and gas pipelines. McInnes’ employment has stayed fairly steady at around 80, even during down times in some industries.

Why Erie County: One of the greatest advantages of being located in Erie County is proximity to raw materials, Hunter says. About 90 percent of the company’s materials are within 100 miles. This helps McInnes keep to its efficient production schedule.

Challenges of Erie County: One of the biggest challenges that McInnes Rolled Rings is facing echoes something I’ve heard from other employers, particularly manufacturers, in Erie County – securing a trained and capable workforce for the future. Hunter has identified a need for a pipeline to ensure that younger workers get the training they need to fill the gaps that will be left by retiring employees, who often have a deep skill set. “We have wonderful people working here now,” Hunter says. “The question is 10 years from now.”

Fun fact: McInnes operates the sixth-largest press in the nation – a press that was built just a short drive down 12th Street by Erie Press Systems.

Address: 1533 E 12th St, Erie, PA 16511 or www.mcinnesrolledrings.com.

American Tinning & Galvanizing

If you’ve driven along the city of Erie’s West 12th Street corridor lately, you probably know American Tinning & Galvanizing.

The brick building at West 12th and Cherry streets has been adorned with a new mural every year since 2011. Robin Scheppner, company president, commissioned the first mural in honor of the company’s 80th anniversary. In the years since, the mural has changed to celebrate other aspects of the community, including the Perry 200 festival and the United Way of Erie County.

The current mural celebrates Erie’s manufacturing industry, proclaiming “Rust Belt? No way, think Robust Belt.”

The exterior murals might be new additions, but the business has operated from the same block since it began in 1931 – that is, since Scheppner’s grandfather, Fred Carlson, left his previous plating company and opened his own just down the street.

Carlson started his tinning business with just one employee, but growth soon followed – both in terms of expansion into different areas and into a larger portion of the space at 12th and Cherry. Today, the company’s divisions operate under third-generation owner Scheppner, who is the fifth family member to run the company.

The plant hums with activity, with workers busy using specialized techniques to provide protection on metal parts. In one room, aluminum pieces receive an acid bath. In another, heavier steel pieces are treated. The company no longer offers the tinning that remains in the name, but it has become a leader in galvanizing – using up to 40,000 pounds of zinc per month.

In the hot-dip galvanizing room, skilled workers use ropes and pulleys to send metal pieces through a vat of molten zinc – heated to over 835 degrees. This work is done by hand – not by automation, as it is at many other galvanizing companies, Scheppner says.

“This is a craft. It gets to the point where it’s almost intuitive” for the workers to tell when a piece is ready, she says.

Uniquely, American Tinning & Galvanizing also includes a fabrication division. The fabrication business got its start in the 1950s, when the entrepreneurial-minded Carlsons recognized that there was a market for the equipment – including racks and tanks – that was needed in the plating processes. That operation, Carlson Erie, lives on within American Tinning & Galvanizing today, and supplies not just internal operations but many external clients as well.

“Almost all of our competitors are also our customers,” Scheppner says.

About American Tinning & Galvanizing: The company specializes in anodizing, electroplating and galvanizing –all of which are metal finishing techniques used to prevent corrosion. In the fabrication department, the company is branching out and using plastics to create equipment for customers. The shelf life of plastic tanks is ten-fold that of the old steel tanks, Scheppner says. The company serves businesses in the Erie area but also competes for contracts, particularly in aerospace, from outside the region. ATG has been accredited by the National Aerospace Defense Contractors Accreditation Program (NADCAP), after a rigorous certification process. This accreditation “levels the playing field,” Scheppner says, when it comes to competing for aerospace contracts because it assures clients that ATG has met the very precise specifications mandated for aerospace equipment.

Why Erie County: For Scheppner, one of the best parts about Erie County is the culture – generally friendly and helpful, with an emerging sense of a community coming together. There’s evidence of that in her latest initiative to boost the 12th Street corridor. Colorful signs have popped up along the street in recent months, thanks to a joint campaign by a group of 12th Street business. In addition, Scheppner appreciates that Erie County offers “the opportunity to make a great living” – and for her, that also includes the opportunity to “give a great living to 69 other people.”

Challenges of Erie County: Scheppner says that finding qualified middle managers is one of the largest challenges facing her business. She says that the company requires someone with both management skill and a knowledge of the metal finishings industry – a combination that is difficult to find. She is hopeful that in the future, a training program can be developed to teach both required skillsets.

Fun fact: When Scheppner’s grandfather left his previous company to open his own, he chose the name “American” so it would be listed first in the phonebook.

Address: 552 W. 12th St., Erie PA 16501 or www.galvanizeit.com

Hoffman Industrial

Hoffman Industrial is in the business of moving things.

It’s fitting, then, that the company is continuing to move forward, even with a 171-year tradition in Erie.

Hoffman was founded in 1846 by using horses to move houses. As manufacturing rapidly advanced in the industrial age, however, the company leveraged its rigging and moving skills and moved into machinery. Today, Hoffman Industrial – the oldest rigging and machinery moving company in the United States – no longer moves houses, instead focusing on the specialty skills of moving heavy and hulking pieces of machinery with a deliberate and even delicate touch.

President and owner Art Hammond, who bought the westside Erie business about three and a half years ago, is focused on ensuring that his company is the best at what it does, and that it has a strong – and satisfied – customer base to prove it.

He’s working to build that base by promoting the advantages of Hoffman Industrial – emphasizing that Hoffman workers have the equipment, the experience and the proper insurance to safely move big machinery.

It’s dangerous work, he points out, and it’s not for amateurs. There are angles and math calculations to figure out, and new circumstances with every job. “There’s so much to worry about,” Hammond says. “You have to have patience.”

Hoffman Industrial has further been investing in its equipment and in its employees – making sure workers have necessary training and skills – and has touted that experience in efforts to increase business.

Hammond has added some advertising and is working to expand the marketing and online reach – “We realize that even with a niche business like rigging and machinery moving, an online presence is essential for growth,” he says – and he’s also making sure his employees know of the company’s efforts.

A sign in the employee breakroom spells out the company’s philosophy fairly clearly: “Hoffman Industrial Co. will only employ and promote people who support and satisfy customers.” And upstairs, in a small office, a list hanging on the wall keeps a running tally of new businesses added so far this year – more than a dozen to date.

With so much activity, it’s clear that this moving business is not content to stand still.

About Hoffman Industrial: The company, with 11 workers, has a mix of seasoned and younger employees. Hoffman sends younger workers out for training and certification, since the rigging work is dangerous, and a strong skillset is imperative to employee safety. The company serves businesses in about a 250-mile radius of Erie, largely focusing on manufacturing but also serving other industries, including health care. Here in Erie County, Hoffman is the approved primary rigging company for GE Transportation.

Why Erie County: Hammond sees a lot of positives in Erie County, including its livability. He also says that Erie County still has a strong manufacturing presence – which is essential for businesses like his. When manufacturing is robust, he says, manufacturers “do a lot with their money. They invest in new machines.” And when that happens, Hoffman Industrial is there to move out the old machines and move in the new ones.

Challenges of Erie County: Hammond does, however, say that it is vital that Erie County shore up its manufacturing sector to help stave off future decline. “We have to grow the manufacturing base so that ancillary businesses like us grow. Anything that hurts manufacturing hurts us,” he says. In addition, Hammond would like to see a greater effort from Erie County companies in supporting local businesses. “Nothing irks me worse than an Erie company hiring an out-of-Erie company,” he says.

Fun fact: Hammond is only the second owner of the company to have come from outside the Hoffman family.

Address: 1510 Irwin Drive, Erie, PA 16505 or www.hoffmanindustrial.com

Rudy’s Shoe Repair

In a small corner storefront on the City of Erie’s west side, Rudy Rodriguez is doing more than repairing shoes – he’s living the American dream.

The El Salvador native and his wife, Adriana, have run Rudy’s Shoe Repair since 2015 – a decade after Rudy came to the United States.

His path to becoming a business owner is, as Adriana describes, “quite providential.”

After experiencing problems with his feet, he saw a local podiatrist and then was referred to Walk Rite, a local store that offers footwear and other services for people with foot problems. There, with the help of Walk Rite owner Nathaniel Zimmerman, Rudy started training to learn how to make custom orthotics – and thus the dream began.

“As soon as I started training, I just fell in love with it,” says Rudy, who worked as a tailor in El Salvador. “I saw so much potential.”

Soon, he was working full-time out of the Walk Rite shop, filling a need for shoe repair in Erie.

Before long, Rudy’s Shoe Repair expanded into its own space, at the corner of West 26th and Myrtle streets.

Since then, business has been steadily growing, mostly by word of mouth.

Now, looking around the workshop, crowded with shoes in for repair, Rudy and Adriana see another possible move in their future – an expansion of their successful enterprise to a larger storefront, maybe one with living space above for their family.

When asked if he ever expected to be an entrepreneur – “empresario,” or businessman, as Adriana explained in Spanish – Rudy’s answer is clear: Never. He never pictured himself owning his own business.

But now, with his shop doing a steady business by filling a niche in Erie, perhaps he has realized a dream he never knew he had.

About Rudy’s Shoe Repair: Though the shop started out by only repairing shoes, now they take on all manner of leather products – purses, jackets, luggage, belts, saddles, even furniture. The workshop features a mix of old equipment, picked up secondhand, and new machines that the owners have invested in. As business has grown, so has the need for help. As a result, Rudy’s is no longer a one-man operation. Though Adriana also works a full-time job, she also helps out at the shop, and they also have two part-time employees. Rudy’s Shoe Repair also recently joined the Erie Regional Chamber & Growth Partnership.

Why Erie County: Rudy and Adriana both say that Erie County – and its people – have been very good to them. That includes the training and guidance Rudy received in starting the business, and it carries through today, when they exchange referrals with other local businesses and rely on a network of mentors to help them as they continue to learn the trade. In addition, they have found it is simply a good place to raise their two children, ages 2 and 6. “A lot of people say there is not much in Erie – but there is. You just have to look a little, and you’ll find great things,” Rudy says.

Challenges of Erie County: The challenges that Rudy’s Shoe Repair faces are not unique to the county, or unique to shoe repair. Rather, it’s the burden of any small business owner who wears many hats – greeting and helping customers, filling orders, doing the finances, etc. In addition, Rudy says he works hard to adjust to the differences in culture and language that distinguish his new home from his native country.

Address: 263 W. 26th St., Erie PA 16508 or www.rudysshoerepair.com

 

Coming up next week: We visit Hoffman Industrial, the oldest rigging company in the United States.

 

Burton Funeral Homes & Crematory

My recent visit to Burton Funeral Homes  & Crematory revealed how the business has embraced both tradition and change.

The tradition aspect is readily apparent in the owners, who represent the fifth generation of the Burton family to run the business. The business was founded in 1876, and there are now four Burton locations around the county. The location that we visited, on West 10th Street in the City of Erie, is located in a historic building that has been home to Burton since the 1950s.

As Karen Burton Horstman spoke about the business, however, it became clear that it is now as much about changing times as it is about that deep-rooted family tradition.

The business has adjusted to meet the expectations of modern customers. That might mean offering more ways to personalize a funeral service – including through things like specialized casket accents, a unique urn, or a custom memorial. They’re also keeping an eye on new technology that other funeral homes have used to personalize funeral services.

And, in addition, they find themselves changing to fit contemporary sensibilities – which sometimes treat the grieving process differently than previous generations.

“We’re becoming a less traditional society,” Horstman says. “People are not valuing funeral services the way they used to.”

Burton has also adjusted the business by offering services that people are valuing – including memorials and pet loss services.

For any aspect of the funeral business, Horstman emphasizes the importance of the grieving process. In fact, that’s one of the aspects of the business that she finds to be the most important. As she explains, the death of a loved one is one of the life events that has the most impact on a person.

“People ask me, ‘How do you stand this work?’” she says. “I tell them that you’re helping someone through the worst time of their life. It’s very sad, but it’s also very rewarding.”

About Burton Funeral Homes & Crematory: In addition to the main location on West 10th Street in Erie, Burton operates funeral homes on West 26th Street and on Norcross Road in Millcreek Township, and on Main Street in Girard. The funeral home employs 40-some employees, almost equally split between part-time and full-time. Burton had one of the first crematories in the area, opening its crematory at the West 10th Street facility in the 1980s.

Why Erie County: Clearly, Burton has strong roots in Erie County. And the owners see that as a distinct advantage. “We have been here a long time, so our name has a good reputation,” Horstman says. But she also emphasized that Erie County is a desirable place to live. As she describes, it has big-city assets without being a big city, while also offering advantages like the natural environment and affordable housing.

Challenges of Erie County: Horstman describes a need for a regional view in Erie County, pointing to her experience of operating businesses both inside the City of Erie and in the outlying areas. As she explains, the City of Erie is home to all manner of nonprofits and services that pay no taxes, limiting the tax base – but residents of other Erie County municipalities also use those services. She sees reginonalism as a possible solution to revitalizing the city and its public schools. “If you don’t have schools, you don’t attract people,” she says. “And then how do I stay in business?”

Fun fact: Burton was founded by A.P. Burton, the son of a shipbuilder who helped construct Oliver Hazard Perry’s War of 1812 fleet.

Address: 602 W. 10th St., Erie, PA 16502 or www.burtonfuneralhomes.com

Curtze Food Service

During the daytime hours, Curtze Food Service hums with activity. Warehouse workers steer forklifts among towering shelves, and seafood cutters keep busy slicing into fresh fish.

But the real action starts after normal business hours, when that hum turns into a hubbub.

The warehouse staff hustles to fill orders as delivery trucks rumble in, ready to be filled up and sent on their way, whisking Curtze customers’ orders to points across an eight-state area.

On a recent tour during a relatively quiet afternoon, company President Bruce Kern gestures to a line of 10 bay doors.

“These doors will open and close five times a night” as trucks pull in, says Bruce, who runs the family business with his brother, company Vice President Scott Kern. The warehouse operates round-the-clock during the week to fulfill orders for grocery items, produce, fresh seafood and more.

The efficient, streamlined operation is quite a change from the company that started back in 1878, when an enterprising Curtze ancestor launched a wholesale business to serve the oil drillers and lumber camps that populated northwestern Pennsylvania.

Today, the company – now run by the fifth generation of Curtze descendents – operates three distribution centers (in Erie, Cleveland and Rochester, New York) and utilizes a fleet of 125 refrigerated trucks to serve about 8,500 customers.

And, as Bruce Kern says simply, “We’re growing.”

About Curtze Food Service: The company, which distributes all manner of food and food service equipment – everything but alcoholic beverages, the Kerns say – specializes in “center of the plate” products like hand-cut fresh seafood and meat. The company also distributes fresh produce, some of which comes from growers in the Erie region. All told, Curtze employs between 650 and 700 employees – around 270 of those in Erie County.

Why Erie County: The company’s roots long predate the Kerns, but they seem content with their company’s home. “I’m not one of these guys who is down on his hometown. I happen to think we have a lot going on in Erie,” Bruce Kern says. In addition, Curtze Food Services has found valuable resources in local organizations like the Manufacturer & Business Association and the Erie Regional Chamber and Growth Partnership.

Challenges of Erie County: The biggest challenges facing Curtze Food Service come from location – both at a local level and, more broadly, at a regional level. The company’s current footprint, as Scott Kern describes, “is not a perfect fit” – surrounding properties have the company penned in, preventing expansion at its eastside Erie site. As it is, the company’s specialty meat-cutting facility is down the street from the main office and warehouse. In addition, situating a distribution center on a lake shore has its own set of challenges – namely, that it restricts distribution to a swath of territory to the north.

Fun fact: Curtze’s meat cutters must complete an 18-month apprentice program.

Address: 171 E. 12th St., Erie, PA 16511 or www.curtze.com

Rosebud Flower Shop

The family roots run deep at Rosebud Flower Shop – not just for the florist business, but for its location, at the corner of East 10th and Reed streets on the City of Erie’s east side.

Ruth Thompson’s family has been located at that corner for generations. Her father, the late Erie City Councilman Jim Thompson, started the flower shop nearly 60 years ago, eventually moving it into the East 10th Street location that had previously been home to other family businesses.

Today, Ruth, who also runs the ANNA Shelter and a property management company, is gradually passing the flower shop business on to her daughter, Rosealena Thompson.

Rosealena has been part of the business since she helped out as a child.

Back then, she came up with her own flower arrangements that her mom displayed in the shop – though they were, as Ruth laughingly describes now, “hideous.”

Today, however, Rosealena’s arrangements are colorful and creative – and are boosting business.

She’s also been marketing the business on social media, and making connections in the community.

“Maybe she’s found her niche,” Ruth says of her daughter.

For Ruth, it’s a comfort to see her daughter embrace the business that has been in the family for more than 50 years – in a building that was built by the family in the 1800s.

“Just the idea of someone else having this – the idea of closing it was so hard,” Ruth says.

About Rosebud Flower Shop: The family had previously owned other businesses, including a general store and a hardware shop, at the East 10th Street building. Though the flower shop used to get walk-in traffic, especially in the heyday of GE and Hammermill, today the majority of sales are made online. Other family members join Ruth and Rosealena at the shop, including Ruth’s mother, JoAn, and several siblings. “People say they have a family business. This, literally, is our family’s business,” Ruth says.

Why Erie County: The family’s roots are, of course, vital to why Ruth Thompson remains anchored in Erie – and, more specifically, remains committed to the city’s lower east side. “I can’t imagine leaving this corner,” she says. “I’ve had several opportunities. But this place is our roots.” She also sees continued support from Erie residents in supporting small businesses. “Flowers are a luxury. Same with eating out. People say how horrible the economy is, but people are still buying flowers, and people are still going out to eat,” she says.

Challenges of Erie County: Ruth Thompson’s biggest challenges should be familiar to any small-business owner – trying to juggle all the work that needs to be done. Trying to do the jobs of several people – a necessity for a small business – means that some aspects of the business inevitably get the short shrift.

Address: 660 E. 10th St., Erie, PA 16503 or www.rosebudflowershop.com

 

Coming next week: We check out the operations at Curtze Food Service, also in the City of Erie

 

A. Anthony & Sons

During my visit to A. Anthony & Sons Inc., one thing that stood out to me is the company’s dedication to tradition.

That tradition is evident in the framed photos of earlier generations hanging on the wall of an office.

But there’s also a much, much older tradition to consider – one that dates back centuries.

After all, as company Vice President John Rahner describes, A. Anthony’s concrete mixing follows some of the same essential principles that were established in Roman times.

That includes using Lake Erie sand and crushed limestone from quarries in Michigan and Canada in the concrete mix, in order to guarantee a better product. River/field stone is cheaper, Rahner says, but it’s not as good in our climate for longevity.

The focus on quality is something that the current owners – the fourth generation of the Anthony family – learned from the earlier generations. Rahner’s wife, Peggy Anthony Rahner, is the company president, and other branches of the family are represented as well.

Their Anthony ancestors started the business as a small operation in 1939, and grew the business by adding the batch plant in 1972. That purchase, though originally done out of necessity to get the concrete transported to sites in Erie, proved to be a successful enterprise that continues to boost the company.

Today’s owners still face challenges, including the unpredictable weather that all-too-often dictates the concrete placement schedule. But overall, the Rahners say they are content with their company, and with a business that allows them to create a tangible product for their customers.

“You want a business where at the end of the day, you can say, ‘That was a good day,’” John Rahner says. “And there’s a lot of good days.”

About A. Anthony & Sons: The company, which employs 37 in a full season, operates a ready-mix division, which brings in roughly the same amount of business as concrete placement. The company consumes most of the mix it produces. The majority of the company’s business is in commercial and construction work, though they also do residential work and new building. Some of their work can be seen around the community, including at the Prep and Villa Events Center, the Hagen History Center, and the fountain in Perry Square.

Why Erie County: The business has found a secure footing in the Erie economy. Residents are still investing money in their properties, the Rahners said, In addition, they anticipate an uptick in business as a result of some of the large-scale construction projects cropping up in the county. While the larger concrete firms will likely bid on those big projects, some of the residual work will trickle down to A. Anthony & Sons. Beyond that, the Rahners say, are the characteristics that are unique to Erie. “I’ve lived other places, and you just can’t duplicate the quality of life here anywhere else,” John Rahner says. “And everyone knows your name,” Peggy Rahner adds.

Challenges of Erie County: Some of the challenges that A. Anthony faces have more to do with the nature of the work than anything else. The work requires physical labor, and that can wear on employees – some of whom have been doing that hard work with the company for decades. Efforts to find young, willing workers have been mixed. In addition, the company has found it challenging to work with a bevy of regulations – some on the municipal level, dealing with issues like permits and storm water management, all the way up to agency regulations on the state andfederal levels.

Address: 1450 W. 21st St., Erie PA 16502 or www.anthonyconcrete.com

A. Duchini Inc.

A. Duchini Inc. has been a fixture on Erie’s east side for generations. That legacy was evident as we toured the site.

Inside the office, current owner Jim Duchini describes the people and places in the black-and-white photos that hang on the walls. His grandfather, Italian immigrant Avellino Duchini, founded the company in 1932, and his father and uncles later took over the business.

Outside in the brickyard, Jim Duchini points out a building that was in one of those old photos. Inside a storage area, he points out rows of molds – still used on the site – that were made by a company run by a man posing in one of the old photos.

That history continues to influence A. Duchini Inc. now, 85 years later. Jim Duchini talks with pride about how the company donates block to build baseball dugouts in honor of his uncle. That’s just one example of how A. Duchini Inc. has given back to the community – and to other companies.

Jim Duchini is forging ahead with the same principles that guided his father and grandfather: Create a quality product. Serve the customer. And give back to the community.

About A. Duchini Inc.: The company got its start thanks to the entrepreneurial drive of Avellino Duchini. He was an experienced mason, and when the company stopped making blocks, he bought the machine and started making hand-molded blocks himself. The company now uses much higher-tech machinery to produce products including block, bricks and pavers. The company also manufacturers specialty masonry that is more energy efficient. The company sells real and man-made stone to both construction firms and homeowners; sells and installs fireplaces; and also operates an Ace Hardware store on site.

Why Erie County: Avellino Duchini ended up in Erie, where he had family members, after he came to the U.S. from Italy in the 1920s. It has been home for the Duchini family ever since. Today, A. Duchini Inc. has deep roots in the community, with its products present in many familiar buildings around the area. Current owner Jim Duchini is a third-generation owner; his children, who are also involved in the company, represent a fourth generation of Duchinis in the family business.

Challenges of Erie County: Building regulations, and in particular the inspection regulations that are used by the city of Erie and other municipalities in Erie County, have been hard on the company’s business, Jim Duchini says.

Fun fact: The A. Duchini Inc. facility is capable of producing tens of thousands of blocks per day.

Address: 2550 McKinley Ave., Erie, PA 16503 or www.duchini.com

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén